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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,372 (some duplicates have been removed)
, looks at moments in history when international law or the interpretation of international law has evolved rapidly. he says that we are in the midst of one of those moments regarding the laws that alie to humanitarian interventions and targeted killings. this hourlong program is next on booktv. >> all right. hello and welcome to case could downtown in the city called cleveland. my name's dan, i'm the ceo of the city club, and i'm very delighted to be here today with professor michael similar. michael is the acting dean of the law school, he's the baker hostettler professor of law, a leader in the practice and study of international criminal law and the host of the public radio program talking foreign policy, all of which is wonderful, but we're actually here to talk about something else, his new book. it is called "customary international law in times of fundamental change: recognizing grotian moments." >> wow. >> wow. which sounds like a mouthful of academic jargon, but what it's really about is how certain moments in history create the kinds of conditions for new laws to emerge a
in the indictment. true here, right? so then we've got second on page 13. law enforcement officials bear responsibility for ensuring that the custody of an arrestee does not create intolerable risk to staff and so on. equally true here as in king. >> not with respect to the people i'm talking about specifically. because by the time -- mr. king was in custody long after d.n.a. had connected him to this rape. by the time d.n.a. results could help law enforcement in california, no, what someone has done in the past, whether this person might be dangerous, the people i'm talking about are not in custody, there is no need to make bail determinations. they are free people. haskell was in six days of being arrested issued a certificate saying no charges are being filed. her d.n.a. being tested 31 days later did not help the jail deal with security issues, she was not in jail. >> so define for us what is the class or how do you define the people who to whom this lawsuit applies? as to the members of this class how do you define the people with regard to this class? it hadn't been certified, righ
their privacy rightunder state and federal laws because they are going into the private messages. we're talking about and that is being scanned by facebook and shared by others. melissa: there is an argument that this is violating the electronic communities and privacy act. >> that is the argument. but reallye need to look at what the user agreement is between facebook and its users a master copy of a complaint. and it shows that facebook warns people about what they will do what their wit their data. and some of it includes giving it to advertisers or that they have access to just abt everything. >> under the complaint that says that it compensates the data related to the private messages. and so it does. melissa: decided their hope of? >> it doesn't do them off the hook though. the facebook user agreement is ambiguous on this topic and i thinkor a reason. to take advantage of its privacy -- user privacy for profit. google was recently sued and a judge ruled against google for this exact same thing. google is appealing a trade-off has also been talking about this type of privacy invasion and i
's law applies to people who are never charged with an offense d those who are discharged from lack of probable cause. there is nothing that can justify taking d.n.a. from these individuals who are not being prosecuted. king is tracking people as they go through the criminal justice system up through trial. >> counsel, i respect the sincerity of your view but the reality is the supreme court said in king that d.n.a. was like fingerprinting. if all of the things that you say about your particular clients are true, they would still nonetheless be fingerprinted and their finger prints retained in a national data base just like the d.n.a. how do you distinguish that? the court made it very clear several times that d.n.a. and same, rints are of the constitutionally one is a more modern technology. >> that is not how i read the case. .n.a. is different from finger prints. d.n.a. is our genetic blueprint. finker prints have a history of being used to identify people, they do an excellent job of that. people who are arrested can be identified within minutes using their finger prints. none
holds to make it a reality. because while there is no law or set of laws that can prevent every sense was violence, no piece of legislation that will prevent every tragedy, every act of evil, if there's even one thing we can do to reduce violence, if there's even one life that can be saved, then we have an obligation to try it. as soon as i'm finished speaking here, i will sign a directive giving my enforcement, schools, mental health professionals and the community is tools they need to reduce gun violence. we will make it easier by strengthening the background system. we want them to hire more school resource officers if they want. we had knowledge that someone with a mental illness is far more likely to be a big them of violent rhyme than the perpetrator. i will direct the centers for disease control to go ahead and study the best ways to reduce. they should look into the effect of violent bitty -- violent video games have. we don't benefit from not knowing the science of this epidemic or violence. these are a few of the 23 executive actions i'm announcing today but as important as
' plan all along? ringing in 2014 with 40,000 new laws? here's one. americans getting flicked off in one state it's a felony to flick your cigarette butt but flick off big government it doesn't end there. we'll all be paying the price. and then back to what jonathan -- break out the popcorn we put together some great clips. we take a look back and relive the funniest moments of the past year and oh, boy, you're going to enjoy this. "cashin' in," kicking off the new year starts right now. snoets sfloets. >> hi, everyone, i'm eric bolling. our crew wayne, jonathan, and welcome everybody. liberal like michael moore admitting the truth that obama care is awful and can't be fixed. that's not us saying it. it's him. moore saying the president knew in his heart that a single payer system was the true way to go. and now it's up to liberals to make it happen. michele, you know in your heart universal care is the way to go? >> it's not, but this is what they wanted all along. democrats were happy with obama care because they said, well if obama care works, that's great because it expands the gover
story short, having a good relationship with local law enforcement organizations is key, but not the picture look. then jeff who says, when are people going to pretend that surveillance is anything but unchecked power. >> we want you to be part of the conversation . #ajam stream. >>> 1984, the dangers about a surveillance state. but that was decades ago. often overlooked the role of local and state law enforcement. what some people call little brother. >> what we realized after 9/11, is terrorists don't respect are responsibility and lines of jurisdiction, as regional lines we need to work together to defeat that threat. >> reports of suspicious activity get sent to fusion centers which security analysts say is key. serve and protect is ineffective and infringes on our civil little bit. is little brother effective or counterproductive? joining us is jim harp he, director of informational studies at that time cato center. michael price author of a recent bennett center report recommending reforms for the role of local police and national security. welcome to the stream ev
13. law enforcement officials bear responsibility for ensuring that does not y of one create risks and so on. equally true here as in king. >> not with respect to the people i'm talking about specifically because by the time mr. king was in custody, long after his d.n.a. had connected him to this rape. by the time d.n.a. results could help law enforcement in california know what someone has done in the past, whether this person might be dangerous, the people eem talking about here, they're not in custody, there's no need to make bail determinations for them. they've been unconditionally released. they are free people. lily haskell was within six days of being arrested issued a certificate that said no charges are being filed. her tennessee is being tested 31 days later, did not help the jail deal with security issues. >> you brought a challenge and narrowing it down to an applied challenge as to members of the class. >> in light of king, yes. >> and so what is -- define for us what is the class or what is the -- how do you define the people to whom this lawsuit applies? >> the clas
in the united states between our tax laws and visa policies, they are being forced to invest overseas. that is a shame. >> it is not just immigration issue that hasn't moved swiftly. there hasn't been a ton of things done in congress. you is even more true when look at the telecommunications sector in general. how do you approach washington with knowing there hasn't been a lot of successful legislation on issues you care about most. what is the strategy to get something done, whether it is at an agency or an executive branch? >> i think we have been fairly successful. that happened quickly. we have marketplace fairness to the senate. that is really important legislation that makes it so the brick-and-mortar retailers are the same as on the internet. that is important. there is support for free trade in congress. that is important. everyone, weike want things not to happen. i think it is a matter of sometimes the senate and the asse have as much problem's the republicans. our job is to get them to see this is a national interest year. we have been a supporter of the no labels movement.
not only have the right but the duty to break the law to show our discontent and put political pressure on the president. >> however, a banner held by anti-frac-ing protesters in oklahoma have some concerned they are being unfairly targeted. oregon is now allowing contractors to sue for disruptive and costly protest activity. when does the activism cross the line? joining us is representative noel who has been fighting the environmental movement for years. in oregon we have lauren reagan, the founder and executive director of the civil liberties defense center. and in oklahoma mariah stevensons joins us. she is a member of the environmental group, and was recently arrested for hanging a banner in a public building. there seems to be a surge in environmental activism from the keystone pipeline to those protesting widespread logging of public lands. what is about this that has all eyes focused on the northwest? >> i think right now we're seeing a lot of the defining environmental battles playing out, and as a result of the increase in publicity around the justice movement and climate chan
a hundred year old law that banned corporate elections. and they said citizens united doesn't play. we have a history of how corporations owned the montana government and we don't want to go back. it was challenged again by the lawyer who brought sit citizens united. at the supreme court, they said sorry, citizens united applied even though two justice said it might be good to look at the law perhaps the premise which citizen united is based on is weak if you look at what is happening with money in election but the court didn't have a signed decision. it just said we are not going to hear the case. citizens united applied. >> they overturned the montana's supreme court's ruling? >> yes. i call this a bold conservative majority and this is a good example. there are no regrets. i am not sure what might happen if guns comes up again. but i would be surprised if they backtrack on the district of columbia gun decision. they will probably not backtrack on the individual holding rights. but i think it will be interesting to see what they say on questions that are coming about gun regulations and w
have been traveling the country telling young people to ignore the law? >> no, not at all. >> oh, come on, we have cameras falling you around and you tell young people to opt out. >> no doubt we are telling people to opt out. >> are you ready to opt out of obamacare, right? >> yeah. t possible decision about their health care. they shouldn't pay three times the amount for health care, not for themself but to pay for an older generation. >> for obamacare to work, young, healthy people must pay into the system and not make my claims on it. that way their premiums will subsidize, older, sicker people, who statistically speaking will use more health care services. on this day and this venue, at least, the word seemed to be getting out. >> with obamacare, i'm going to have to pay three, four times more in premiums and deductible and that is ridiculous. >> you are basically a community organizer, aren't you? >> in a way, yes. we are stealing some tactics, to get young people motivated and involved in ways that make a difference. >> the obamacare relies on these young people to be healthy. th
. the gop spent the bulk of last year trying to repeal the entirety of the president's health care law. when that didn't work, they tried to defund it in mid-september. when that didn't work, they tried to delay it. by september 30th on the eve of government shutdown, they tried to delay just the individual mandate which failed. by mid-october, it was clear it was a disaster for the party. so they scaled back their demands, trying for a symbolic victory to repeal the law's medical device tax which also failed. by mid-november, they had abandoned outright attempts to kill the law, instead trying to ease restrictions on so-called junk insurance plans as a way to disrupt the law. and that didn't work. so today party leadership outlined a new strategy for 2014. according to a party memo from house majority leader eric cantor, the plan is to introduce legislation to, quote, strengthen security requirements of the website including a law to require the government to publicly disclose every time personal information is compromised. cms put out a response to cantor telling him if you're looking for
the court, this case is fundamentally different from king because california's law applies fully to people who are never charged with an offense and those who are want of probable cause under mcclough lin and gerstein. interests that king identifies can justify taking d.n.a. from these individuals prosecuted being because all of king's interests relate to tracking and monitoring people as they the criminalugh trial. system up to >> counsel, i respect the sincerity of your view, but the reality is. the supreme court said in king that d.n.a. was like fingerprinting. if all of the things that you say about your particular clients are true, they would still nonetheless be fingerprinted and their fingerprints retained in a national data base just like the d.n.a. how do you distinguish that? the court made it very clear several times that d.n.a. and fingerprints are of the same, ilk constitutionally, the only one a more modern technology. >> that is not how i read the case. fingerprints are different than d.n.a. fingerprints tell us nothing about ourselves. d.n.a. is our genetic blueprint. fing
was fouchbltd police a found. is the obama administration breaking the law? 11 attorney generals alleged blasting the obamacare fixes and insists the illegal actions must stop. they're taking kathleen sebelius and cabinet members. >> why do you say the president is breaking the law? >> greta, this is the president supposed to enforce the laws not forbid the enforcement of laws. what we're seeing time after time over the past few months the president found the obamacare law put him and his political future in a corner. he goes about trying to change the law. repeatedly over the past few months the president has forbid the enforcing of the law or change the law to suit his ends. he does so unconstitutionally. only congress can pass a law. the president does not have the power to make up a law and judge credibility acting as a court. we got away from that when we got away from britain. we have the president acting like the king of the united states. >> where do you're draw the line? congress legislates they write the laws and the president ex kuex execut executes. they can drop one charge a
very much coverage for it. what wasund out needed, developed legislation and pass the mental health law of 1980. passed one month before he -- an voluntary removed from the white house. one of the greatest disciplines of my life. >> more from our first ladies series tonight. the first series on betty ford. tomorrow we will show you the recent first lady's program on rosalynn carter at 9:00 on c- span. today, joined us for more on the q&a series. is yuval levin. there is a look at some cell research. issues01 one of the big that the new president faced was the question of whether and how the federal government should fund embryonic still -- stem research. the question was whether it was moral it in the promise or potential of it to spend public money on that kind of research. the president made a decision in which he was advised that said you could spend money on lines that are it existed at that point, but not on new ones. of announcingrse that decision, he said these kinds of issues will stay with us. and we need help in thinking about them. he called together a group of 18 scholars, a
of the 113th congress. later in the week members plan to vote on bills related to the federal health care law including one to protect personal information used on the web site, healthcare.gov. live coverage of the house over on c-span. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: and joining us this week on "the communicators" is gary shapiro who is president and ceo of the consumer electronics association. mr. shapiro, who do you represent in that association? >> guest: we have over 2,000 u.s. technology companies. everyone who's involved in innovation and has electricity going through it. or. >> host: and what are some of the issues that you're concerned about? >> guest: well, we for example on the issues you would expect the tech industry. we are focused laser-like on innovation. we want to make sure innovation is a national strategy and american companies can keep introducing the neatest products to the world. you know, we dominate in so many areas. we have a lot of foreign multi-nationals, it's a global
and independents. we are talking about the health law and where things are headed, not only this week, but for the rest of 2014 and beyond. we look forward to your participation. we make sure we are reading those and getting as much information on the table as possible. to the insurers, are they ready? guest: more so than they were. the timeframe between now and when people are supposed to get insurance is very tight. many insurance companies have been scrambling to ensure the people who they think are coming are the right people, the people that signed up think they signed up are actually on their roles. -- rolls. i think the folks in the insurance industry i talked to are optimistic they will get things worked out, but there were probably be a few more bumps along the way as well as people begin showing up in trying to use the insurance. host: tell us more about the potential problems hanging over january 1. guest: to make sure they are signed up for the plans they think they signed up for, that they get enrolled properly. most people think it will not be the same types of problems
provisions were put into law specifically to stop the slide in the wages, the real wages earned by agriculture workers in the united states which are today significantly below the wages that were earned in real inflation-adjusted terms two or three decades ago. they have decreased the value of the earnings of those workers because of the abundance of supply of illegal workers that are hired by those agricultural employers. >> the panel you referred to this morning looking at conference of immigration reform, their interests collectively, while different, were using the narrative of it being in the economic self-interest of the country to do this, the economic interest of the country. they talked about individual pieces of legislation that went to some of the sectors of this coalition, like the h1b, high-tech folks, agricultural interests. they refer to legislation, small pieces of legislation that are speaking to these different pieces of the puzzle, as not being adequate. yet, there was some saying they would support this if you kept the dialogue going. is there any legislation
year trying to repeal the entirety of the president's health care law. when that didn't work, they tried to defund it in mid-september. when that didn't work, they tried to delay it. on september 30th on the eve of government shutdown, they tried to delay just the individual mandate which failed. by mid-october, it was clear it was a disaster for the party. so they tried to repeal the law's medical device tax which also failed. by november they had abandoned outright attempts to kill the law instead trying to ease restrictions on so-called junk insurance plans as a way to disrupt the law. and that didn't work. so today party leadership outlined a new strategy for 2014. according to a party memo from house majority leader eric cantor, the plan is to introduce legislation to, quote, strengthen security requirements of the website including a law to require the government to publicly expose every time it's compromised. cms put out a response to cantor telling him if you're looking for smoem, keep looking. quote, today there have been no successful security tacks on hairk.gov and
court. the president doesn't get to create the law, write the law and decide and adjudicate it. it has to go before the supreme court. >> let's play sound from march of 2013. what james clapper testified to the, i believe, a senate and congressional panel. listen to the sound bite. >> does the nsa collect any type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of americans? >> no, sir. >> it does not? >> not wittingly. there are cases where they could inadvertently perhaps collect, but not wittingly. >> so given what we now know, that appears to be a false statement given to a senate panel. should james clapper be prosecuted? >> lying to congress is a felony. i don't think we can pick and choose the law. you have people like james clapper and others beating the table saying we want to put edward snowden in jail for life, yet they don't want the law applied to themselves. the law has to be applied equally. that's one of the tenets of american jurisprudence. apply the law equally. i think it would be enlightening for james clapper and edward snowden to share a prison cell. maybe we'd
for republicans and democrats and independents. we are talking about the health law and where things are headed not only this week but for the rest of 2014 and beyond. we look forward to your percent -- to -- participation. we make sure we are reading those and getting as much information on the table as possible. to the insurers, are they ready ready? guest: more so than they were. the timeframe between now and when people are supposed to get insurance is very tight. many insurance companies have been scrambling to ensure the people who they think are coming are the right people, the people that signed up think they signed up are actually on their roles. folks in the insurance industry i talked to are optimistic they will get things worked out. be a few were probably more bumps along the way as well as people begin showing up in trying to use the insurance. us more about the potential problems hanging over january 1. they get enrolled properly. most people think it will not be the same types of problems there were with the medicare part d, was people obviously get prescription drugs pretty muc
on january 13th. >>> bicyclists are getting excited about a new law that will keep them safer on the roads. officials say 40% of deadly crashes between bikes and cars happens from behind. the law goes into effect on september 16th. that makes california the 22nd state to require such a law. >>> time is 4:40. a man is under arrest in connection with a shocking death of a popular brees. coming up in our 5:00 hour the contact he had with police just hours before the crime. >>> a push to bring more 49ers fans to the playoffs. >>> good morning. right now we are looking at a commute that looks pretty good. san mateo bridge traffic looks good off to the high-rise. we'll tell you more about that straight ahead. >>> if you are traveling to green bay, you might want to bundle up. below zero temperatures. here. will we continue to see those near 70 degrees? >>> welcome back. you're taking a live look in boston where the snow is obviously falling this morning. a major winter storm is pounding the east coast. and we just learned as well jfk airport is also shut down this morning. if you are heading the
's eve, a federal judge overturned the law in florida that required those applying for federal health care benefits to be tested for drugs. for our first 45 minutes, talk about the details of the case. we want to gain your thoughts on the topic. here's how you can reach out to us on the phones. the numbers are on your screen. on our social media channel, you can reach us on twitter, facebook, or e-mail. as far as the polling, we posted a question must night. there is responded this morning. for those taking it, 75% say that yes, people should be tested. no,t 594 people said welfare recipients should not be drug tested. you can leave comments and participate in the polls if you want. join the conversation there. make your thoughts known on twitter. if you want to give your thoughts and comments on the phone, please use the numbers provided. a little bit about this case. the decision was made on new year's eve. here is the reuters writeup grid the judge struck down the law requiring drug screening for welfare recipients. he says it by leaps it be constitutional protections. rick scott c
agreement, 20 years now since it was signed into law. >> in your book "the happiest ife" it's the first time you discussed your kids. >> a man heard me talk about my threatened her. we stopped talking about the kids on the air. lot had that debate with a of public figures and as a result i often said to young who are in our business your children forward because there are crazy people who will try to get to you through them. are they now? >> the youngest is 22. college, not paying for anymore. the others are 25 and 28. >> my daughter doesn't care much for politicings. do, but only one listens and he loves talk radio, business. e whole >> we're going to talk a lot about what happened in your on , the first question is work itself. why do you spend this much time on the radio? ith all of the radio, your harvard background, your michigan background. >> i think radio is the longest media that's of left. what we're doing is an hour-long onversations, unprecedented, only c-span does long form conversation anymore. ou read books the way i read books in order to talk to the arthur seriously. nd it's
citizens using major u.s. online service providers. programs such as the so-called prism and the laws on the basis of which such programs are authorized potentially endanger the fundmental right to privacy and to data protection. the present case as reported in the media is also likely to reenforce the concerns of e.u. citizens regarding the use of their personal data online and in the cloud. already in 2012, 70% of e.u. citizens were concerned that their personal data held by companies could be used by a purpose other than the one for which it was collected. the prism case as reported in the media also highlights the difference between the european union and the united states. whereas in the u.s. system only u.s. citizens and residents benefit from constitutional safeguards, in the european union everyone's personal data and the confidentiality of their communications are recognized and protected as fundamental rights irrespective of their nationality. while reports are particularly worrisome -- >> colleagues, commissioner, 500 million european citizens were very shocked last week to
, -- it's not 1900% clear. disclosure laws would be upheld. >> that's right. exactly. the court did it in citizens united on eight justices who did endorse the disclosure current requirements. only justice thomas dissented in that decision. i know it doesn't look very hopeful i think that congress is the way they're on a deeing regulation trend until the supreme court. >> what can change normal terms of obama or anyone else couldn't even get through nominations for regular courts though supreme court. >> the presidential elections do matter. >> hi, i'm jim. my question deals with roberts vote on the health care issue. do you think he was motivated by the fear that the court began to look like a political entity rather than a jurisprudence entity? >> you're welcome to speak to this too. it's probably one of the most common questions we get, isn't it? >> yeah. do i think so? no. i take him at the word. i take him as sincerely trying to grapple with the issues presented in that case. i think he was first inclined to vote with the four conservatives and strike the law down as violating
that not only do assault weapons bans have a negative rate, but concealed carry laws may end up in lower rates of homicides. mark gates authored the study, an examination of assault weapons bans on state level murder rates. it was published in the journal of applied statistics. >> thank you for having me. >> conventional wisdom from gun control advocates. tell me what you found as it related to concealed carry permits. >> regarding concealed carry weapons laws, essentially when i found is those states that had more restrictive concealed carry weapons laws had on average gun related murder rates that were approximately 10% higher. and that is on average, over the 29-year period from 1980 to 2009, that i was looking at. >> now, your studies are consistent with the 1997 study which you also cite. but ther there are a number of studies out there that argue the opposite of what your study has found. a study published last mar and one published in november found that higher rates of gun ownership led to higher number of gun homicides. is there any way you can reconcile your data with these studies?
-- [laughter] i think you have got six months on me. >> i do. after 50 years only of teaching at harvard law school, this is your last semester. >> right. >> what does your future hold? >> oh, who knows? i don't think of this as a retirement, i think of it as a career change. i've had the same job 50 years. you've been prime minister of a great university -- president of a great university for 20 years, that may be a world record. by the way, steve's new book on presidencies derailed is a brill p i can't book, and it's not only about presidencies, it's about leadership failure, success, it's just a great book. >> thank you. >> and, you know, i think when you get to be our age, you do think about what you would like to do that you haven't done. people asked me all the time is there anything you haven't done? well, if there has been, i want to do it. i'm going to write more books, i'm going to litigate more cases. the only thing i'm not going to do is teach. i've taught 10,000 student, and they've ranged from ted cruz on the right to eliot spitzer. now, don't blame me for, you know -- [laughte
to the law are illegal. elizabeth prann has the latest on the site. >> 11 u.s. attorney generals sent a letter to health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius saying they are breaking the law. the continuous changes with obamacare without going through congress is illegal. the ex certainty of the letter reads, the attorneys general allowing citizens to keep their health insurance coverage. however the only way to fix this law is to enact changes lawfully through congressional actions. the illegal actions must stop. greg abbott one of the 11 who signed the letter had this to say. >> only congress can pass the law. they cannot make up the law and judge the credibility acting as a court. we got away from that when we got away from britain. >> this letter comes the same day as the public health study released in the journal science shows people who access to healthcare are making more trips to the emergency room casting doubts on the president's promise back in 2009 when the administration released in part if we are increasing prevention increasing wellness programs reducing the
will get to practice law in california. >>> netflix customers could be flown for a loop. the new pricing plan is tested out. >>> and the driver's worst nightmare. the new tool police are using thionines more tickets. we are back in a few. ,,,,,,,, california man who's been lg here illegally now practice law. >> a huge victory tonight for a california man who has been living here illegally for years. he is now practice law. john blackstone on the landmark decision. >> reporter: sergio garcia was alone in his office when the supreme court granted him a law license. >> it has been a long, long journey going on five years, you know. i graduated law school in may 2009 and here we are 2014. and we finally have the final piece of the puzzle that will allow me to fulfill my dream. >> reporter: he was brought to the u.s. from mexico when he was only 17 months old. he passed the bar exam on his first try but because he is undocumented, federal law prevented him getting a law license. but federal law could still present a barrier for garcia. in its filing in the case, the justice department says is
on obamacare. day three, new problems for that law. this time coming from 11 state attorneys general. that group sending a letter to sebelius. their message in that letter, president obama is breaking the law making changes to the health care law without going through congress. elizabeth prann on this live from washington. what are the details of this letter, elizabeth? >> reporter: good morning, bill. back in november the president chenged his mind and he said insurance companies could for one more year sell old policies even if they were unacceptable under affordable care act parameters. attorney generals targeting that move, saying quote, flatly illegal, under federal, constitutional and statutory law. in part the group writes, we support allowing citizens to keep their health insurance coverage but only way to fix this problem-written law to enact changes lawfully through congressional action. remember the white house is also delaying employer insurance mandate for one year. some lawmakers are saying this too requires congressional votes. bill? bill: speaking of lawmakers, what a
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,372 (some duplicates have been removed)